Good Foods and Drinks When Trying to Conceive

Trust me I know…the last thing you want is another diet right now, but what you do want to know what are the good foods and drinks when trying to conceive. It is a very important matter that most women and couples miss out on in their ttc efforts, and it’s one that could have a drastic effect on your natural fertility and ability to easily conceive…or at all for that matter.

This article is only part one of a many part series so please do make sure to look through my other articles and read part 2, as there is much to discuss regarding food and drink during this time, and it can’t all be done in one article.

Let’s start with the most basic and important nutrient of all….

WATER!

Need I say more about the need to drink LOTS of water every day? The startling fact is that most people go around slightly dehydrated much of the time. I thought it was very strange that I had to keep reminding my husband to take a drink of water when we were on long trips…otherwise, he just didn’t think about it! The one good thing about the bottled water craze is that it’s got most of us thinking about putting more water into our bodies. Since evidence has recently come to light that the clear, disposable water bottles have toxic substances that may affect the water inside, just carry an opaque sports bottle with iced water inside. Make sure your loved ones have one, too. Think about it…the inside of our bodies is filled with moving parts that all require water to work well. And what woman isn’t aware of the effect of lack of moisture on the skin?

During pregnancy and lactation, you will need to drink 8 to 12 eight-ounce glasses of liquids every day. Here are a few reasons why water is so very important to us – it provides for transmission of nutrients to cells, balancing acids, holding salts and cushioning the body’s organs. Water contributes 55 – 65% of our adult body weight. The fetus also requires an abundant supply of fluids to develop properly in its prenatal environment.

The amount of water required by the body can vary greatly from person to person, and environment to environment. Pregnancy and lactation, exercise, heat, dry climates and high fiber diets are all factors that increase the body’s hydration requirement. Inadequate water consumption can lead to fatigue, muscle weakness, and decreased mental alertness in pregnant women. For the fetus, it can mean inadequate transportation of nutrients, ineffective removal of waste matter, an overly-warm uterine environment, and insufficient fluid in the amniotic sac. As you can see, the effects of dehydration can jeopardize fetal growth and development. In some severely-dehydrated women, premature labor and delivery can occur. So…even though water bottles are being banned in some communities now, the national thirst for bottled water has made us all aware of the need for hydration.